img_5952Levile TV were lucky enough to attend the impressive screening of short film 18 (2018) at the prestigious BAFTA venue in Piccadilly circus. A very busy room to say the least!

Here is our breakdown of the film created by Teddy Nygh and the team at Fully Focused.

Narrative – As part of Network Rails commitment to increase safety and awareness amongst young people across the UK, the senior heads at the company teamed up with UK Fully Focused to create a short film to showcase the dangers of citizens playing in danger zone’s such as rail tracks that possess voltage too powerful for the human body to withstand.

The story centre’s around a young male called Eddie who’s decision’s come to haunt him after an unfortunate incident causes tragedy that leaves his friends and family grieving. Fully Focus describe the plot as ‘They say life starts at 18. Jerome and Eddie are all set to give Ali the 18th birthday to remember… but for all the wrong reasons… 18 is a powerful story of friendship, love and regret.’ 

(SPOILERS)

Cinematography – The colours in the opening scenes are bright and warm. The colour palette for the short film brings back a sense of nostalgia that naturally draws viewers in. The costume for each character against the settings indoors and outdoors provide the audience with a sense of comfort, almost child like playfulness. As the film progress we see a shift into darker colours that sets the tone for the latter part of the film. Our favourite shot in the film is the outdoor scene where Harry is walking in a deserted countryside and is clearly struggling to come to terms with the death of his best friend. The scene is beautifully directed by Teddy Nygh and shows the mental struggle a young person endures in solitude despite the best attempts of his father Steve Oram  (Sightseers).

Cast – The film stars Aimee Kelly (BBC Wolfblood), Harry Kirton (Peaky Blinders), Shaquille Ali-Yebuah (Netflix’s iBOY). Shaquille carries a natural charm on-screen (quite reminiscent of a young Will Smith in Fresh Prince of Bel Air), you can’t help but fall in love with his character and the ‘laddish’ relationship between himself and Harry Kirton’s portrayal of Eddie. An honourable mention must go to rising actor Jaz Hutchins who played Jerome’s older brother in the story.

Overall rating – We give 18 a solid 8/10. The story is important and shows the pitfalls of young people playing in danger zones near train stations. The cast was strong and the cinematography was well executed.

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